#NZFW Designer Interview: Dmonic Intent

#NZFW Designer Interview: Dmonic Intent

Taking time out from shows, work, performing to focus full time on social media and blogging for the week, I’m attending almost all 2012’s Fashion Week shows and will be posting regularly through out the week.  Although it is a busy schedule it is rumoured to not be a strenuous as in years past – I should be so lucky!!
#NZFW Opening party Ceiling lights

A couple a have high expectations for are the Treliese Coooper show, Stolen Girlfriends Club, and NZ Wedding collection shows, specifically Auckands’ Wedding Designer answer to Valentino, “JOHN ZIMMERMAN” and the forever dapper, “The Crane Brothers”.  The Miromoda show is one I’m taking particular note of; showcasing indigenous Māori fashion design and working to raise its artistic and professional recognition.

Follow my fashion feed @missphloss #NZFW
For more about the Miromoda and New Generation Shows check out this behind the scenes video Featuring a behind the scenes Interview with DMONIC INTENT.  Feeling like a privaledged guest watching from sidelines for the Show Card shoot for this brand bringing it to Fashion Week for the second time and making a big splash in the Māori fashion design world. Their fun relaxed attitude shows through as they bring their flavour of Avante Guarde to NZ Fashion Week.

Yours truly Phlossy Roxx –  Taking Fashion Week Seriously only 98% of the time.  Hope you don’t mind.

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What to do in Winter: Scrapbooking with Maggie Armstrong

What to do in Winter: Scrapbooking with Maggie Armstrong

When Scrapbooking what does a normal session consist of and how much preparation do you have to do before hand?
Typically, when I sit down to scrapbook I don’t usually have a particular project in mind.  I keep a pile near my art desk of newly purchased products, and an idea will often spring to mind as I shuffle through them!  So maybe that means
preparation = scrapbook shopping!!!!

 I almost never start and finish a project in one sitting.  I usually have to come back to it a few times.  The benefit of this is that each time I return to it I see it with different eyes and the creative process often takes a different turn.  So I never really know what I’m creating until the deed is done!


How did you get into Scrapbooking and what made you decide this is what you wanted to take further?
A good friend introduced me to scrapbooking when my eldest child was still a baby.  I needed some sort of creative/productive outlet to relieve the sometimes tedious job of motherhood! 
Through the craft I have met some amazing women who will be lifelong friends.  The scrapbooking community is full of hilarious, creative and fun loving people and I have had so many great scrapbook adventures/roadtrips along the way – why would I give it up?

What tips would you give new others who might be interested in taking up Scrapbooking?
The most important piece of advice I can give is to never compare your work to others.  Watch this short clip on YouTube.  What is obvious to you is amazing to others.  If you think you’re not creative – think again!

Have you ever been in a situation where someone hasn’t taking your Scrapbooking work seriously?
Haha! You’re talking about my husband right??!!!  ‘Crap-booking’  is what he used to refer to it as!  But to be fair, in recent times he has become more appreciative of the craft and often pulls my work out to show visitors!  He also ‘gets’ that it’s about preserving memories for our children and is supportive of that. 

Scrapbooking itself very specialized – is this something you’ve learned in through education system or did you fall into it?
I have developed my craft by attending workshops, reading magazines and browsing online blogs.

What effect has the Internet had on Scrapbooking and how you do it?
The internet is a huge source of inspiration for me!  There are oodles of incredibly talented beings out there and it’s wonderful that so much of their work is shared though online blogs.  The internet is also the go-to tool of choice for me if I am unsure how to use a new art medium or I want to push the creative boundaries further.

What is the biggest, most exciting project you’ve worked on / are most proud of?
When I was approached last year by NZ Paperchase magazine to apply for a place on their Elite Design Team I was quite thrilled!  I had 3 weeks to prepare my submission which included 3 different projects – a traditional layout, a card and an OTP (off the page) item.  I was successful in gaining a place and now I design projects for their quarterly magazine. 

Have you got anything exciting in the pipeline that you would like to share with us?
Well, yes actually!  I have been asked to teach in May 2013 at an international event alongside some of the biggest names in the industry – a la Donna Downey, Theresa Collins and Heidi Swapp.  I will be teaching approximately 300 people (luckily I don’t suffer stage fright huh?!).  So I’m busy putting together an awesome project using some very different mediums (e.g. melted beeswax!) so hopefully I will stack up against these ladies! 
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Not your normal Job: Nick von K – Jewellery

Not your normal Job: Nick von K – Jewellery

I love jewellery!!  Hand made unique items are GORGEOUS and super special and I want to show you all one of  my favourite designers!  Nick von K!!    Rock&Roll and high fashion! Yes please!

What does a guy like you on a normal day “at work”?

I spend most of my time working on strategy for the business, which can be anything from how we will go about moving into Australia, to organising a photo shoot, to talking to prospective new clients, to liaising with customers on commission work. And of course, preparing to go to Bali to design the next collection.
My wonderful assistant Anja takes care of the workshop where all orders are filled and stock is organised – which frees my time up so I can work on the business instead of ‘in’ the business.
In Bali I design. The process for me has become one where I leave a lot of the designing until I get to Bali. I like to have the theme pretty solid before I go, with a few ideas floating around in my head. But once Im there its all about honing each idea while I ride on my scooter through the hill villages and rice fields. I ride for a total of 3 hours, every other day, to the silver village and the carving village, and I find this perfectly suited to meditating on each design and fleshing them out. Something about the tropical heat, the weaving ride and the beautiful views puts me in exactly the right space for designing.

How did you get into the industry and what made you decide this is what you wanted to make a living out of?

When I was about 20 I was playing around in a few different creative fields, namely; painting, music, writing, jewellery and sculpture. I met a great mentor at that time who suggested rather than being a jack-of-all-trades, I pick one to master. And he then suggested I pick jewellery as the one that seemed to have the most promise for me.
Well, he was right! It took a few years to get it going but once I hooked up with Ricochet making all their accessories things really began to take off. So I guess at the beginning I wouldn’t have chosen this path for myself if it wasn’t for the great advice I received – but looking back now it makes so much sense as I personally love to wear a lot of jewellery and I always have.
I have to say I think I have the best job in the world, and I consider myself very lucky as I always wanted a creative career. Not to say there isn’t a lot of hard work involved, of course there is – but its hard work that is very satisfying.

What tips would you give new others who might be interested in a similar career?

Its really not that difficult to make and sell jewellery, many of the shops I sold to when I started out were really open to looking at my creations and buying them. I think that’s a New Zealand thing – its not like other countries that have a lot of chain stores that are hard to contact let alone sell to, there are a lot of individual shops who all want something different and are really open to meeting new designers and viewing their designs.
Of course, it is perhaps hard to make a decent living out of it, but that just takes patience and perseverance, and a bit of good luck and good management. So my advice would be to give it a go, and then keep going – if you stick at it eventually you will break through.
The other great piece of advice that was given to me was never pretend to know everything – if you approach people in the industry, including the shops you want to sell to, with an attitude that you are interested in their advice then they will most likely give it to you. People love to give advice and often its invaluable, so ask questions and listen to the answers.

When did you discover there was life outside the corporate 9-5 Office grind?  Was there a specific event or epiphany that brought that about?

Hahaha, that’s a funny one. You know I’ve never really had a 9 to 5 job. When I was 17 I met a psychic who told me that they really couldn’t see me doing the typical 9 to 5 – which I instantly knew was 100% correct. And that knowledge completely freaked me out because I thought “Well, what the hell am I going to do then???”. So from that point on I was always looking for the alternative situation. You know the funniest thing is that these days I often do work from 9 to 5, but working for yourself is a completely different story.

Have you ever struggled to get what you do at work or out of work taken seriously?

Ever since I was a child I have made things in my spare time. My parents constructed a small workbench for me under the house where I would spend hours every day making all sorts of odds and ends, and I would often give these away at Christmas as presents to the family. Or else I would be drawing and painting somewhere, and generally making a mess.
But funnily enough my parents made it very clear to me that being an artist was not an option as “Artists never make any money – until they’re dead.”
Finally after dropping out of a boring commerce degree at Uni I took to my passion of painting,  and my Mum, bless her heart, helped finance me into a studio where I could live out my dream. The painting never really took off, but it did lead to jewellery – and its been ever so sweet to be successful as an artist before I’m dead!!

Your work is very specialized – is this something you’ve learned in an education system or did you fall into it?

I once did a night course in jewellery making, which gave me some basic skills, but really its something that I have learned along the way. Working with the team at Ricochet for many years taught me a lot – initially they would give me designs to make, or we would design together. And then gradually I would bring more and more to the table.
I began going to Bali during this period and that really expanded the possibilities of what I could design. Then when I decided to begin the Nick Von K label I had years of experience in Bali to draw upon, and so I took that knowledge and expanded upon it into what I do now.

What effect has the Internet had on the way that you work?

We launched the website nickvonk.com at the same time as the label itself back in September 2010, and it has been awesome for the business. Everything from direct sales, to stylists here in NZ and overseas finding us, to prospective shops researching us.
Plus I often search for images on the net that will explain a design that is in my mind to a wax carver or bone carver. Then I’ll print these out as a reference for when I sit down with the carver to go over the idea.
Facebook has also been a great resource. Being able to communicate directly with the customers and fans on the Nick Von K facebook page is invaluable, especially as I mostly wholesale to shops so often do not meet the people who buy my stuff.

What is the biggest, most exciting project you’ve worked on / are most proud of?

Being involved with the American clothing designer Nicole Miller has been amazing. We met just as I launched the label at the 2010 NZ Fashion Week where she bought some of my jewellery for herself and for her stores in the States. Then when I told her I was coming over to New York she organised a launch for the label at her Soho store. The launch was even filmed by her team and produced into a short clip on youtube. You can find the link to it on our website in the press section. She also took a huge crowd out to dinner afterwards and sat me down next to the one and only Heather Graham (aka Roller Girl). So there I was talking chit chat with a very beautiful and famous actress all night long – I couldn’t believe it!!!

Have you got anything exciting in the pipeline that you would like to share with us?

Right now I am in Bali working on the next collection. At the moment its all under wraps so I can’t really tell you anything about it until its officially launched in the coming months. But let me say that personally I am really excited about it – its quite a fresh direction for me so be prepared for something a little bit different to the previous seasons. I’ve also given myself plenty of time to work on each design so the ideas are really fleshed out and there are lots of little details for people to discover.

I’ve a very special unique commission Nick von K piece in the pipeline myself!  I can’t wait to show you all… its going to be to die for gorgeous… I’m excited just thinking about it.  He made this beautiful honey bee ring on commission for my beautiful friend Leda Petit…  


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Not your normal job – Clinton Cardozo (VanguardRed Magasine)

Not your normal job – Clinton Cardozo (VanguardRed Magasine)

I love having interesting people to talk about.  Bloggers, writers, photographers, creatives, geeks and my list could go on and on! I’ve known Clint for easily 5 or more years and worked with him on many projects.  This guy is inspirational, his energy is amazing and passion for the projects he takes on is infectious. If your going to succeed there’s nothing better than surrounding yourself with others with the same drive and desire!

What did you do before you started VanguardRed?

Right before VanguardRed I ran a small creative studio called Renegade House in which we made a whole bunch of design, photography and video projects as well as a digital pop culture magazine. But for the last 12 years I’ve been a photographer and graphic designer primarily in the design industry.

What tips would you give new web-entrepreneurs to help them start out on a path to success?

1. The first thing is to define what success means to you. For some its money, for others it’s fame or legacy. So outline your goals clearly and concisely and then figure out your path to get there. This generally means building some kind of framework to work within. It’s the equivalent to going grocery shopping without a shopping list; you end up doubling back to what you needed and somehow have a lot of junk food at checkout. So have a plan. Even a loose one will do to begin with.

2. Do your research well. What you will find out when you research extensively is that your awesome idea is already being developed by someone else. It’s not exactly like someone else’s, but its close. Find out what other people in your field are doing. Find their fuck-ups, learn from them, make your stuff better.

3. Get help. there are many people out there who are willing to help you out so ask for it. You will not get anywhere without pulling a few favors. I make it a point to help everyone who asks for my help and I’ve always got those favors back.

4. Love failure. get used to it. if you are creative professional failure is your best friend. But it’s not a bad thing. its just there to keep you on track like brakes down a curved slope.

5. Have paperwork. Don’t start any job or venture without adequate paper work outlining agreements between clients or partners. Paper work is like getting a flu shot, mildly painful but safer in the long run. 

When did you discover there was life outside the corporate 9-5 grind? Was there a specific event or epiphany that brought that about?

The thing about corporate 9-5 jobs are that you will always have to report to someone who is responsible for your salary. You play by their rules. Your work is generally uninteresting and the guy you take your orders or ‘suggestions’ from doesn’t really know what they are talking about. But you HAVE to do it or your bills don’t get paid. I always knew that there was life outside the corporate grind because there were people out there doing it. I just had to be brave enough to take that step. It’s scary when you are out on your own.

I don’t think there was a specific event as such but I realized early on that if I worked for myself I could control the amount I worked, choose my clients appropriately, potentially earn more than a base salary and have fun doing it. It’s not all awesome however. I’ve noticed that when you are working for yourself you are constantly hustling. And when you stop, you don’t get paid. But I enjoy doing what I do so it doesn’t feel like I’m ever overworked. 

Have you ever struggled to get what you do taken seriously?

I used to. Mostly because I was young, excited and had big ideas. Sometimes I wouldn’t be taken seriously because I’m indian. Not because the people were racist, its just that they considered me an outsider. It takes time for people to understand that outsiders generally have an objective view on things and can change the market completely since they see the flaws from the outside.

Not any more though. I have a very large body of work that spans a lot of creative fields. I can also articulate my ideas more clearly now that I understand the NZ creative culture. I choose to believe I personally don’t matter, the work should speak for itself. 

A lot of what you both do is very technical – is this something you’ve learned in an education system? 

I think true mastery of anything technical comes from spending hours at it. The education system is exactly that, a system. And the problem with systems is that they take time to get updated. I love the safety net of an education system where you can experiment and get critiques etc. But the real world is a beast of it’s own. There’s nothing to prepare you for it besides hard work, discipline and acceptance of failure.

You are not afraid to voice an opinion in the public media.
What effect has that had on the way that you work and do you think you’re making a difference?
Yeah, its inevitable to make enemies when you stand for what you believe in. It’s the nature of the game. You can’t change anything if all your are doing is pleasing people. You become a YES man. Everyones got a choice to either be a sheep or a shepherd. I chose to be the landowner. I didn’t like the magazine publishing culture here in NZ and I just started my own one. I hate complaining and dislike people who complain. I’d rather come up with a solution than harp on about the problem. 

It’s too soon to tell if it’s made any relevant change but I don’t really care. I enjoy my life the way it is and I choose to live it that way. 
 What is the biggest, most exciting project you’ve worked on / are most proud of?

I’ve got to say that VanguardRed is the most excited I’ve been about any project. It’s going to be full of inspiring multimedia content and awesome interactivity. Also, it’s giving the younger generation of creatives a chance to get their work seen in the market. I also have a great team of professionals I’m working with so it all feels great. 

Have you got anything exciting in the pipeline that you could share with us?

Yes, its our very own store with high quality products specifically curated for the youth and fashion conscious market. You can buy products directly out of the editorial page or adverts that feature our stocked products. Thats not too far away but stay tuned on our blog at vanguardredmagazine.co.nz where we are actually sharing information on how to start your own digital magazine. 

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Not your normal job: Yolanda Bartram, BodyFX

Not your normal job: Yolanda Bartram, BodyFX

Where better to get 3D candy pasties than from New Zealands’ own Body Art, Special Effects company BodyFX  with a new studio just opened just down the road from First Scene.  I went to the Launch party and have since interview Yolanda the Lady of BodyFX.  From competitions and workshops all round the world to Top Model and body art Burlesque.. this team can do ANYTHING!!

What does a girl like you on a normal day “at work”?
There is no such thing as a normal day… unfortunately I do spent a lot of time on the PC, something I would like to do less of this year and focus more on creative projects. Right now there is a lot of planning and organizing events and projects, buying new products for the shop and sorting out all the courses that I’ll be teaching this year in New Zealand and abroad.

How did you get into the industry and what made you decide this is what you wanted to make a living out of?
I got into it through my mum, she started painting me when I was 16 and then decided that it would be fun to try it out myself. I wasn’t quite sure It would be a full time career so I also did a Fashion Degree course at Massey. Unfortunately I don’t find much time for the sewing side of things anymore, but very happy to do so well with the thing I enjoy most!
5 years ago I attended the world-champs for the first time and came second, that was the point that I kind arrived in the scene, and things gotten bigger and better since.

 

What tips would you give new others who might be interested in a similar career?
You really have to be passionate about it, I spend most of the time working but when you enjoy what you do it does not feel like work. Also in the last 10 years the face and body art industry has grown like crazy, you really have to stay on top of your game and grow your skills.

When did you discover there was life outside the corporate 9-5 Office grind? Was there a specific event or epiphany that brought that about?
Never done the 9-5 as I have grown up in this job, and as it is not a job it is more 24-7.

Have you ever struggled to get what you do at work or out of work taken seriously?
I think my in-laws are still not convinced it is a career choice and think I am slightly mad for it. (If people think you’re slightly mad- you must be doing something right!) But hey, I don’t mind proving them otherwise…

Your work is very specialized – is this something you’ve learned in an education system or did you fall into it?
I have done some training, normal make up and airbrushing, and I am still learning all the time. As I have been traveling lots I have been privileged to work with and see some amazing artists creating their work. Also Youtube is a great source of information… (check out their channel!)

What effect has the Internet had on the way that you work?
Huge I must say, I spent a lot of time there. Either to promote my work, sell products, get inspiration or stay in touch with my fellow painters around the world.

What is the biggest, most exciting project you’ve worked on / are most proud of?
Wow I guess there have been a few, I think the ones I am most proud of are the ones that I set out to do like winning the World Champs and working on New Zealand’s Next top model or the Rugby World Cup Opening. The most glamorous one is still the launch of V Australia, Flying to Sydney to paint for Richard Branson was pretty epic.

World Champs

Have you got anything exciting in the pipeline that you would like to share with us?
Well this year would be little less travel and more play at the homefront. I am looking forward doing some projects around Kingsland, where our new Studio is based, A lot more online presence through Youtube tutorials. We’ll be at Bloom and Splore festival and we’ll have loads of courses and workshops coming up.
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Not your normal job: Nat Hugill (Lilly Loca)

Not your normal job: Nat Hugill (Lilly Loca)

When you float around in a community you end up meeting people of similar interests.  In this case performing, and producing events.  This burlesque bombshell is not only an amazing performer but a laugh to hang out with over a sneaky tipple or two.  I recently worked with her at the December Dr Sketchy at the Wine Cellar and am looking forward to working with her again.  I’m guessing from this interview she’s a little bit of a workaholic, much like myself, filling up every spare moment with creative flare!  Guess life is too short to waste being boring right – Hope you enjoy this interview with the Lovely Lilly Loca!

What does a girl like you on a normal day “at work”?

Well, I’m a drama teacher at a local high school and I am also the Creator, Producer and MC for ‘Lilly Loca’s Vaudeville Cabaret’ and am also a performer myself. So.. on a typical workday, I will wake at 5.30am, go to the gym, get myself a soy flat white to jump-start my day, then teach on average four drama classes during the day, ranging from Year 9’s to Year 13’s. During my non-contacts I’m creating resources, doing admin, organizing scripts, marking and trying to save my sanity 😉 Then when I get home I’m usually on the computer organizing performers, run-sheets, schedules and all the admin associated with producing a ‘Lilly Loca’s Vaudeville Cabaret’ show. Then, if I’ve got a gig coming up that I’m performing in, I’ll try and get some practice in. I live a very busy life, but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

How did you get into the industry and what made you decide this is what you wanted to make a living out of?

Teaching wise, I love working with young adults and really honing their skills and developing them as people and performers. Nothing is better than getting what I call ‘proud mummy syndrome’ when you’ve worked really hard with your students on a particular assignment and watching them get up on stage and blow you away with their performance. 

With performing, I have been performing since I was in nappies (literally). When I was younger I would put on skits for my parents and anyone who happened to be around at the time. My earliest memory of performing was me performing to ‘Ms Otis Regrets’ (the Bette Middler version). I started drama classes at the age of 8 and started Latin American and Ballroom Dancing from when I was 11. I grew up doing mostly theatrical performances and it was only in about 2009 that I started to spread out on my own and do live performance outside of theatre. I studied theatre at university and also took outside acting classes; I was always (and still am) looking for ways to professionally develop myself as a performer. In 2009 I created my alias Lilly Loca as a burlesque artist. When I started teaching however, I moved away from burlesque and have really developed Lilly into a character – she’s a juxtaposition of both extremes of my personality – crazy, loco with witty (and a bit inappropriate) humour and also a tranquil, peaceful and sedate side. I now put on my “Lilly Loca” character for MCing gigs like Dr Sketchy Auckland and my show ‘Lilly Loca’s Vaudeville Cabaret’ and I also do cabaret performances under that name. Last year I really wanted to get back in touch with my acting roots and this year I plan on trying to get more involved in theatre performances. I got to be involved in an awesome explorative new-age theatre show called ‘Stranger Things 4’ where I got to create a performance piece with writer Natalie Smith, which was a wicked experience. I’ve been lucky enough to branch out at work on shows like ‘Legend of the Seeker’ and work with some amazing photographers (Jocelen Janon and Bryan Lowe to name a few), producers and other amazing performers. I feel very fortunate. I feel like I’ve sort of found my “niche” as a performer now and just want to keep developing it. 
As a Producer…well…I created ‘Lilly Loca’s Vaudeville Cabaret’ because I saw a niche for a variety show in Auckland. I knew of one variety show (which was ‘Burlesque as you like it’ by The Dust Palace) but then it was from the burlesque angle. I wanted a show that appeals to everyone and had a bit of everything in it. I wanted people to feel the awe of seeing the feats a circus performer can perform; laugh and cry at the jokes of a comedian, be aroused and entertained by the tease of a burlesque artist; be moved by the movements of a beautiful and euphoric dancer; be seduced by the melodies of a jazz band and enjoy entertaining stories, monologues and performance art by actors. So.. that’s how the show came into existence!

What tips would you give new others who might be interested in a similar career?

Teaching wise, MAKE SURE YOU GO AND GET SOME EXPERIENCE AT A SCHOOL FIRST! I was lucky I worked as a Dance, Drama and Musical Theatre Tutor for a year and a half before I started by Post Grad Dip in Secondary Teaching, so knew what it was like to teach in a school environment. I think a lot of people have this grandiose idea what it’s like, then go to Teachers College and realise on their first practicum it isn’t what they thought and end up leaving. Plus, only ever take up this position if you are passionate about what you do. As a drama teacher, I may teach between the hours of 9-3pm, but after school rehearsals, performances, etc take a lot out of your spare time. I didn’t have any school holidays off due to rehearsing with my kids. This summer holiday is the only one I’ve had! Haha. Also, even as organized as I am, I still end up having to work weekends to mark assignments, etc…so if you’re not prepared to give up some of your “outside school” time to the profession, I suggest you look elsewhere. 

 For being a performer… I’m a big advocate of professional development. If you’ve never performed before, and depending on what avenue of performing you’re interested in, I’d go and do a course or some day courses to give you a good grounding. I’d also go and see as many shows as you can of what you’d like to do to get inspired. I think it’s SO important to make yourself original…I’ve tried to always push myself to be extroverted and different to everyone else as a performer…of course, I do take inspiration from people and shows, but it’s about taking influences and creating something of your own. Also, once you’ve got enough experience under your belt, approach and agent who can get work for you. The Human Agency (who I’m with) promote dancers, singers, circus artists and actors.

Producing wise…I think to get into it, you need to believe in your ideas, be meticulously organized, love what you do and not do it because you want to make money out of it. The last one I can’t emphasise enough. I do this show as a labour of love and because I LOVE it. If I make money, great, but that’s not what it’s about. It’s about putting on a good quality show which showcases the best performers NZ has to offer. I get a kick of seeing audience members laughing and saying how much they enjoyed the show. I also love seeing NZ’s best on the stage and doing what they do best. It has allowed me to meet and work with some amazing people and I’m truly thankful and honoured. 

 When did you discover there was life outside the corporate 9-5 Office grind? Was there a specific event or epiphany that brought that about? 
Hmmm…I remember a defining moment when I left university and worked for a advertising company. We specialised in employment and when the recession hit, guess what was the first thing that went down the googler? Yep, jobs. So the company literally within 5 months of the recession hitting went into liquidation and I was made redundant. While working there, I felt a real void. I was so busy I couldn’t perform and performing was my life, so I thought “what the hell am I doing here?”. I decided when I was made redundant that life was too short and I may as well be doing what I love. So, I decided to do drama tutoring, found a company that had an opening for a Drama, Dance and Musical Theatre tutor and “hey presto!” I started living the dream. That job also allowed for me to have time to get into performing again and that’s when I started doing live performance.

Have you ever struggled to get what you do at work or out of work taken seriously?

Nope. I’m one of those lucky people who work within the performing arts, so my whole world is revolved around it.

Your work is very specialized – is this something you’ve learned in an education system or did you fall into it?

I did a Grad Dip in Secondary Teaching at Auckland University, but I also did a Bachelor of Arts double major in English and Classical Studies, as well as doing a minor in Theatre. Producing wise, nope! I had been involved with many theatre shows and had been around long enough to know the ins and outs. I basically tried to be at meticulous as I could and it worked! Haha. 

What effect has the Internet had on the way that you work? 
HEAPS! Where the hell would I be without Facebook! It’s been a great promoting tool as well as a great way to network. I do the majority of advertising for my show online through Eventfinder, who also has links to NZ Herald, etc. I am starting print advertising this week for my next show ‘The Wunderbar Spectacular’.

What is the biggest, most exciting project you’ve worked on / are most proud of?

It would have to be my show. The first show ‘The BIG Reveal!’ was photo-documented by Jocelen Janon and Bryan Lowe of ‘Light Traffic’ Photography and they made a book on my show. The show also sold out three days beforehand. Our second show ‘The Big Timers!’ brought in 70 people on the night of the NZ vs. France semi-final for RWC so I thought that was quite a feat! This next show ‘the Wunderbar Spectacular’ is probably the most elaborate with some amazing internationally recognized performers. I also have some awesome businesses on board such as Miss Piggy’s Cupcakes who will be selling cupcakes at the show and BodyFX who have sponsored some body art for the show.

Have you got anything exciting in the pipeline that you would like to share with us?

YES! Come along to ‘The Wunderbar Spectacular’!   Friday 20th & Saturday 21st January, 2012 Eventfinder   Vaudeville (noun): A type of entertainment popular chiefly in the US in the early 20th century, featuring a mixture of specialty acts such as burlesque, comedy, dance, acting, circus and live music! The Vaudevillians performing in ‘The Wunderbar Spectacular’ are:  Venus Starr (next on my wish list to interview!), Mark Scott, Kozo Komatsubara, Anastasia Elektra, The Spietatet, Lilly Loca, (the gorgeous) Vivien Masters.

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